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Burping

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Burping – The Right Way to Burp your Baby
A lot of time is usually spent by mothers in achieving the perfect burp! But the truth is that all babies do not require to be burped.
Need for Burping:
Babies tend to swallow some amount of air while drinking milk and this is higher in bottle fed infants when compared to breast fed babies. By burping, you help to bring up the air bubble which if accumulated in the stomach can cause discomfort and also prevents the baby from drinking more milk. When the baby burps, some amount of milk may also be thrown up which is perfectly normal.
Some babies will need to be burped half way through a feed while others are ready to wait till the complete feed is over. If you are breastfeeding, then burp your baby each time your switch breasts. In bottle fed infant, burping must be done after your little one has taken 2-3 ounces or 60-90 ml of milk.
Right Way to Burp your Baby:
  1. Burping your babyHold and place your baby against your shoulder and gently rub or pat his back till you hear the burp. It is most effective to pat on the left side of the back where the stomach is situated. This helps to bring up the air bubble faster.
  2. After three months, you can also place your baby upright on your lap to burp. It is not necessary to wake up your sleeping baby for burping. In such situations, put down your baby in the cot and then pick him up after a while. This change in position often helps to bring up the air bubble.
Burping can sometimes be messy, so place a towel or bib under the baby’s chin or on your shoulder in case a small amount of milk is bought up.
Burping your baby at night:
It is not necessary to burp your baby at night as much as you would during the daytime as babies tend to suck much slower and hence take in less air during this time. For the first two to three months, your baby will need to be burped at night too but this can be stopped once your child crosses the five month mark.
When can you stop burping your Baby?
Active burping need only be done during the initial three to four months after birth. By the end of the sixth month, your baby will learn to swallow less air and also gain better control over feeding. Most often, you can stop burping by the end of the fifth or sixth month when the baby is put on semi solids.

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